15 January 2009

SF DMV (iii)

Once verified, I finally got a number. That's right, all that just to get a number. I had to write a few sentences saying I will give my plates back to Nevada. I'm not sure if I will though, they do have my name on them. I ordered new plates and asked for them when my number was called.
"Did you get a postcard? We send a postcard when they come."

"No."

"Well then they're not here."

"Can you check? I don't live anywhere near here, and it would be great if they were ready."
She stood up, took a few steps, and turned.
"When did you order them"

"A month ago."
And she finally went. That last part was a lie. I only ordered them two weeks ago at the most. But they can't really take eight weeks. And she only asked so she would have a reason to not walk the 20 feet to check. No. My vanity plates are not ready.

Then came the tallying. I knew I was going to be penalized because (while doing so to her face) I did not lie on my registration form. I told the DMV I've been here since September. I did so knowing I was going to be fined. I thought to lie. My father would have told to do so. My boyfriend would have too. I even filled out a form with falsified dates. But for some reason, I went back and filled out a form with the right dates. My honesty cost me an extra $73. The woman couldn't believe my honesty but I told her it was still just a little more than what I would have paid in Vegas anyway. She told me the state needs the money anyway. And she's right.

At this rate, California will not make payroll come March. Judges have been told to expect IOUs for paychecks and the same may come in lieu of state income tax returns. For the lady at the DMV, it means two unpaid days, every month, for the next 18 months. She said she needs her job and all of her hours and that she's not sure what she's going to do. So I hope my $73 helped.